CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET
CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET
CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET
CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET
CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET
CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET
CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET

In 1955, the Soviet Union met with seven satellite states to sign the Warsaw Pact, officially known as the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation, and Mutual Assistance.

Soon after, the Czechoslovak People’s Army were quick to mutually assist themselves to their allies’ combat gear. The following years earned them a reputation for adopting, cloning, and modifying soviet bloc gadgets, clothing, and camo patterns — each piece tweaked to suit Czech sensibilities. In short, the USSR let young Czechoslovakia borrow the family Honda, and a new suspension, grill, and racing spoiler were installed moments later.

This camo pattern traces back to German splinter pattern (Splittermuster) and marsh pattern (Sumpfmuster) designs from World War II. These inspired Poland’s wz58 Deszczyk (“raindrop”), the first “rain pattern” camo. The Warsaw Pact allowed other nations to co-opt this design, leading to the East German Strichtarn and the Czech Jehlici/Oblaky pattern (“needles” and “clouds” respectively).

The Czech design widened the lines of the pattern from their narrower origins but kept and expanded the practice of dappling beneath the camo with water-stains. Issued from 1963 through the 80s, later versions saw this unique mottling fade in prominence, while light and dark grey color variants were common throughout. The design proved to have a unique edge against night vision — the water stains disguised the pattern by appearing over it, transforming it into an alt-terrain camo resembling World War II Leibermuster (a design that infamously inspired the Swiss TAZ 83, soon dubbed the “pizza camouflage”).

Specs

  • Authentic Czechoslovakian Cold War surplus
  • Czech-modified rain pattern (Jehlici/Oblaky)
  • Thick cotton polyester twill
  • Five pockets
    • Three interior (right hip, left hip, and breast)
    • Two exterior (breast and back)
  • Waist cinch cord

Condition

Before use, wash with cold water and a non-bleach formula.

As authentic Cold War surplus, some dirt and other signs of long-term storage may be noticeable on arrival. These should disappear in the wash. Jackets are in great condition with no tears or stains, and minimal fading.

CZECH M60 RAIN PATTERN FIELD JACKET

Rated 4.0 out of 5
1 Review
Regular price
$19.99
Sale price
$19.99

Sizing Chart

In 1955, the Soviet Union met with seven satellite states to sign the Warsaw Pact, officially known as the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation, and Mutual Assistance.

Soon after, the Czechoslovak People’s Army were quick to mutually assist themselves to their allies’ combat gear. The following years earned them a reputation for adopting, cloning, and modifying soviet bloc gadgets, clothing, and camo patterns — each piece tweaked to suit Czech sensibilities. In short, the USSR let young Czechoslovakia borrow the family Honda, and a new suspension, grill, and racing spoiler were installed moments later.

This camo pattern traces back to German splinter pattern (Splittermuster) and marsh pattern (Sumpfmuster) designs from World War II. These inspired Poland’s wz58 Deszczyk (“raindrop”), the first “rain pattern” camo. The Warsaw Pact allowed other nations to co-opt this design, leading to the East German Strichtarn and the Czech Jehlici/Oblaky pattern (“needles” and “clouds” respectively).

The Czech design widened the lines of the pattern from their narrower origins but kept and expanded the practice of dappling beneath the camo with water-stains. Issued from 1963 through the 80s, later versions saw this unique mottling fade in prominence, while light and dark grey color variants were common throughout. The design proved to have a unique edge against night vision — the water stains disguised the pattern by appearing over it, transforming it into an alt-terrain camo resembling World War II Leibermuster (a design that infamously inspired the Swiss TAZ 83, soon dubbed the “pizza camouflage”).

Specs

  • Authentic Czechoslovakian Cold War surplus
  • Czech-modified rain pattern (Jehlici/Oblaky)
  • Thick cotton polyester twill
  • Five pockets
    • Three interior (right hip, left hip, and breast)
    • Two exterior (breast and back)
  • Waist cinch cord

Condition

Before use, wash with cold water and a non-bleach formula.

As authentic Cold War surplus, some dirt and other signs of long-term storage may be noticeable on arrival. These should disappear in the wash. Jackets are in great condition with no tears or stains, and minimal fading.

average rating 4.0 out of 5
Based on 1 review
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100% of reviewers would recommend this product to a friend
Sizing
Rated 0 on a scale of minus 2 to 2, where minus 2 is Runs Small, 0 is True to Size and 2 is Runs Big
Performance
Rated 4 out of 5
1 Review
Rated 4 out of 5
Review posted

Very well made

Shows signs of use but I don't think any country could have made these any better.

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Sizing
Rated 0 on a scale of minus 2 to 2, where minus 2 is Runs Small, 0 is True to Size and 2 is Runs Big
Performance
Rated 4 out of 5
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