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Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack
Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack

Most of our surplus is just that, surplus. It’s kept a roof over our heads for years, but it’s not without its peculiarities. That unmistakable smell of a decade spent in a musty shipping container, the unexplained stains, and despite the good price the outdatedness of an item compared to modern, ergonomic gear. But every once in a while we get access to new gear, untouched and in the box thanks to a contract overrun or a fallen-through deal with a foreign military. 

In this case, we hit the motherlode. We got our hands on Crossfire Australia’s DG-16, a long range patrol ruck that’s more exo-suit than backpack. The amount of time, blood, sweat, tears and super-computer simulation runtime devoted to the design of these packs is mind-boggling. We were able to get an overrun of them in Australia’s classic DCPU camo pattern, as well as a run of all-black packs the company probably made for some foreign death squad and then just decided not to sell. Until now...

These packs are so over-engineered that I have to break down the features into chapters to do it justice, so we’ll start with chapter one, The Frame.


The Frame

The feature that sets these packs apart from everything else on the market is, more than anything else, its entirely novel support system. Crossfire spent years experimenting with and perfecting the design of this pack’s semi-rigid frame to not only support and redistribute the weight of carried equipment vertically, but to actually redirect the energy of a wearer’s movement back into the torso on the next step. I wasn’t joking when I said this pack was part exo-suit.

On top of the novel load and energy redistribution, these frames interface with a luxuriously padded, fully adjustable “H-Harness” shoulder strap system. The shoulder straps meet an oversized upper back pad instead of attaching separately. This helps avoid the pressure on the nerves, blood vessels, and muscles in the shoulders for a much more comfortable fit under load. Hip pads are removable and adjustable, and feature a “pull forward” system to snug the pack into your body rather than pull it away on adjustment.

You can adjust the shoulders closer or farther from the neck depending on your wingspan, move the harness up or down on the frame depending on torso length and desired center of gravity, and adjust the sternum strap up, down, in, and out to manage tension and accommodate a well endowed chest or wired comms on the front of a plate carrier. 

Speaking of plate carriers, this bag was designed to accommodate armor and load-bearing systems worn on the user’s back in conjunction with the pack. It has a deep cavity in the middle of the frame that swallows up a plate carrier or allows for unfettered airflow for those going sans armor. 

 

The Ergonomics

That’s just the frame, now we can get into the meat and potatoes of actually using the bag once you’ve got it set up for your height, build and desired load distribution. The inside of the pack comes with mesh dividers to help organize your gear and keep it visible and quickly accessible. Straps and velcro make the interior organizers completely customizable and removable. An interior hydration bladder slot also doubles as a radio harness. 

The bottom 1/3rd of the pack is divided internally from the main pocket, and can be accessed through a slicked zipper to get to your sleep system or other equipment without removing everything else in the pack. It has an internal cinch system to keep it compact, and a “butterfly” compression clip system on the outside to keep it even slicker. The bottom of the pack has drain holes hidden behind the MOLLE, and has an integral waterproof cover that can be unfurled and strapped down around the pack as well.

This bag has full MOLLE  all the way around, with slightly elongated distances between the webbing to make mounting extra pouches and equipment much easier. The bottom of the pack has multiple MOLLE rows as well to accommodate soft ammo pouches or a bedroll. There’s a reinforced velcro entrenching tool pocket halfway down the front of the pack as well. To accommodate rapid removal both shoulder straps have a quick-detach function. Remove the hip pads and clip them around the back of the pack and you can get this thing off in under a second during a patrol.

The outside has two water bottle pockets, both oversized and capable of accepting Australian or USGI 2-liter canteens. Along the side of the pack are two full-length sleeves, where you can fit an axe or even a slicked down weapon system like a bolt action rifle. Heavy duty velcro-flap protected side zips traverse the full length of the pack on both sides allowing quick access to gear without disassembling the entire compartment. Shoulder straps feature several MOLLE slots all the way down, allowing for a hydration tube retaining Grimlock or strappable strobe to be affixed.

The top-lid is removable and the pack comes with an extra “patrol lid” that actually doubles as a 24-hour assault pack. The pack also features a waterproof cover that folds out and down to keep the interior of the pack protected even with the lid removed. If you’re stashing the pack and using the 24 hour assault pack this keeps the pack and its contents safe from the environment. The assault lid makes a great pillow as well.

 

Wrapping It Up

It’s rare we get access to sizable stash of gear this good, especially cutting edge kit like this. We use them ourselves during our 15+ milers at 7000+ feet, and we’re in good company as these are becoming the favored bags of the SAS, Australian Commandos, Finnish/Swedish Jaegers and our own illustrious 10th Special Forces group.

Designed with actual military end users in mind and sporting cutting edge ergonomics these bags are the real deal. If you’re looking for a “buy it for life” bag, this is it. 

Would you like to know more? Check out Bush Lore Survival's 25+ minute long-term review of the pack and its features.

 

Specs

  • 10 Pounds Empty Weight
  • 500D Cordura Construction
  • 85 Liter Capacity + Extra Assault Pack Lid
  • Rare Australian DCPU or Black Coloration
  • Designed for patrols/hikes lasting 96 hours or longer
  • Features Crossfire’s Lightweight Ergonomic 20” Frame

Crossfire Australia DG-16 Long Range Patrol Pack

Rated 5.0 out of 5
Based on 1 review
Regular price
$324.99
Sale price
$324.99
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 

Most of our surplus is just that, surplus. It’s kept a roof over our heads for years, but it’s not without its peculiarities. That unmistakable smell of a decade spent in a musty shipping container, the unexplained stains, and despite the good price the outdatedness of an item compared to modern, ergonomic gear. But every once in a while we get access to new gear, untouched and in the box thanks to a contract overrun or a fallen-through deal with a foreign military. 

In this case, we hit the motherlode. We got our hands on Crossfire Australia’s DG-16, a long range patrol ruck that’s more exo-suit than backpack. The amount of time, blood, sweat, tears and super-computer simulation runtime devoted to the design of these packs is mind-boggling. We were able to get an overrun of them in Australia’s classic DCPU camo pattern, as well as a run of all-black packs the company probably made for some foreign death squad and then just decided not to sell. Until now...

These packs are so over-engineered that I have to break down the features into chapters to do it justice, so we’ll start with chapter one, The Frame.


The Frame

The feature that sets these packs apart from everything else on the market is, more than anything else, its entirely novel support system. Crossfire spent years experimenting with and perfecting the design of this pack’s semi-rigid frame to not only support and redistribute the weight of carried equipment vertically, but to actually redirect the energy of a wearer’s movement back into the torso on the next step. I wasn’t joking when I said this pack was part exo-suit.

On top of the novel load and energy redistribution, these frames interface with a luxuriously padded, fully adjustable “H-Harness” shoulder strap system. The shoulder straps meet an oversized upper back pad instead of attaching separately. This helps avoid the pressure on the nerves, blood vessels, and muscles in the shoulders for a much more comfortable fit under load. Hip pads are removable and adjustable, and feature a “pull forward” system to snug the pack into your body rather than pull it away on adjustment.

You can adjust the shoulders closer or farther from the neck depending on your wingspan, move the harness up or down on the frame depending on torso length and desired center of gravity, and adjust the sternum strap up, down, in, and out to manage tension and accommodate a well endowed chest or wired comms on the front of a plate carrier. 

Speaking of plate carriers, this bag was designed to accommodate armor and load-bearing systems worn on the user’s back in conjunction with the pack. It has a deep cavity in the middle of the frame that swallows up a plate carrier or allows for unfettered airflow for those going sans armor. 

 

The Ergonomics

That’s just the frame, now we can get into the meat and potatoes of actually using the bag once you’ve got it set up for your height, build and desired load distribution. The inside of the pack comes with mesh dividers to help organize your gear and keep it visible and quickly accessible. Straps and velcro make the interior organizers completely customizable and removable. An interior hydration bladder slot also doubles as a radio harness. 

The bottom 1/3rd of the pack is divided internally from the main pocket, and can be accessed through a slicked zipper to get to your sleep system or other equipment without removing everything else in the pack. It has an internal cinch system to keep it compact, and a “butterfly” compression clip system on the outside to keep it even slicker. The bottom of the pack has drain holes hidden behind the MOLLE, and has an integral waterproof cover that can be unfurled and strapped down around the pack as well.

This bag has full MOLLE  all the way around, with slightly elongated distances between the webbing to make mounting extra pouches and equipment much easier. The bottom of the pack has multiple MOLLE rows as well to accommodate soft ammo pouches or a bedroll. There’s a reinforced velcro entrenching tool pocket halfway down the front of the pack as well. To accommodate rapid removal both shoulder straps have a quick-detach function. Remove the hip pads and clip them around the back of the pack and you can get this thing off in under a second during a patrol.

The outside has two water bottle pockets, both oversized and capable of accepting Australian or USGI 2-liter canteens. Along the side of the pack are two full-length sleeves, where you can fit an axe or even a slicked down weapon system like a bolt action rifle. Heavy duty velcro-flap protected side zips traverse the full length of the pack on both sides allowing quick access to gear without disassembling the entire compartment. Shoulder straps feature several MOLLE slots all the way down, allowing for a hydration tube retaining Grimlock or strappable strobe to be affixed.

The top-lid is removable and the pack comes with an extra “patrol lid” that actually doubles as a 24-hour assault pack. The pack also features a waterproof cover that folds out and down to keep the interior of the pack protected even with the lid removed. If you’re stashing the pack and using the 24 hour assault pack this keeps the pack and its contents safe from the environment. The assault lid makes a great pillow as well.

 

Wrapping It Up

It’s rare we get access to sizable stash of gear this good, especially cutting edge kit like this. We use them ourselves during our 15+ milers at 7000+ feet, and we’re in good company as these are becoming the favored bags of the SAS, Australian Commandos, Finnish/Swedish Jaegers and our own illustrious 10th Special Forces group.

Designed with actual military end users in mind and sporting cutting edge ergonomics these bags are the real deal. If you’re looking for a “buy it for life” bag, this is it. 

Would you like to know more? Check out Bush Lore Survival's 25+ minute long-term review of the pack and its features.

 

Specs

  • 10 Pounds Empty Weight
  • 500D Cordura Construction
  • 85 Liter Capacity + Extra Assault Pack Lid
  • Rare Australian DCPU or Black Coloration
  • Designed for patrols/hikes lasting 96 hours or longer
  • Features Crossfire’s Lightweight Ergonomic 20” Frame
average rating 5.0 out of 5
Based on 1 review
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1 Review
Reviewed by James
Verified Reviewer
I recommend this product
Rated 5 out of 5
Review posted

Best Pack Out There Innit Bruv

Owned one of these for a year now (before stocked on Kommando Store) and it is by far and away the most comfortable pack I’ve ever used (even more than my smaller day packs). I don’t know how to describe why it’s so comfortable it just doesn’t feel like there’s weight on your shoulders. Beyond that it’s durable, the material does a decent job of keeping stuff dry (Id still get a cover for proper monsoon stuff) and easy to organize everything. I personally don’t use the day pack that it comes with; there is a lid you can replace it with that’s also good. I chucked a few long pouches on it and bobs your uncle it’s bloody innit bruv yeah nah yeah nah

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